.

Body Language Channel Garage Rock in 'Well Absolutely' (Dubka Remix)

Brooklyn pop group gets jangly update

Body Language
Courtesy of Om Records
September 19, 2013 9:00 AM ET

Brooklyn alt-pop quartet Body Language specialize in danceable, disco-fied hooks and just released their second LP, Grammar, on Lavish Habits and Om Records. Now you can take an exclusive listen to a remix of the album cut "Well Absolutely" from London-based producer Dubka. Flipping the script a bit, Dubka turns the thumping synth cut into a jangle-rock anthem that's rather reminiscent of some of the Strokes' early material (if they really liked Katrina and the Waves' "Walking on Sunshine," that is). That's not a bad thing, of course, as frontwoman Angelica Bess' sun-drenched vocals sound right at home around the snappy, syncopated guitar riffs.

Check Out All the Hottest New Rock Pictures

"When we approached ambitious young London-based producer Martin Dubka for a remix of Body Language's 'Well Absolutely,' he thought that the original version already sounded like a remix,'" multi-instrumentalist Grant Wheeler explains to Rolling Stone. "His idea was to do a 'de-mix,' re-creating what he thought the original version of the song sounded like. He played all the instruments himself and created his sugary, feel-good pop rendition that zings like a bottle of cream soda on a hot summer day."

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com