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Bob Seger Releases Live Albums on iTunes

Studio output remains unavailable in the digital store

September 13, 2011 8:45 AM ET
bob seger itunes
Bob Seger performs at his tour opener in Ohio.
Scott Legato/Getty Images

After years of holding out, Bob Seger and the Silver Bullet Band's music is finally available in the iTunes store. The rocker, who is about to head out on a major U.S. tour, is testing the waters in the digital format by releasing his newly reissued live albums, Live Bullet and Nine Tonight, in the digital format. Aside from these two live sets and the compilation Early Seger, Vol. 1, Seger's studio output will remain missing from digital shops.

Photos: Bob Seger 2011 Tour Kickoff
Seger has been one of the longest-running and most high profile iTunes holdouts, along with Kid Rock, AC/DC and Garth Brooks. Much of the singer's catalog has been available in the store for years, albeit in the form of soundalike cover versions recorded by anonymous acts such as The Original Masters, whose lead singer performs Seger's tunes with an inferior impression of his distinctive rasp.

Related
Bob Seger: 'My Career's Winding Down. I Can't Do This Much Longer'

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