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Bob Dylan Poems Surface as Part of Book Due Out in November

September 15, 2008 11:39 AM ET

A pair of poems written by Bob Dylan have been published in The New Yorker magazine. The poems — simply titled "#17" and "#21" — were penned by Dylan in an era closer to The Times They Are A-Changin' than Modern Times. They will be featured in the upcoming book Hollywood Foto-Rhetoric: The Lost Manuscript, which pairs 23 Dylan poems with classic Hollywood photos by photographer Barry Feinstein, who also photographed Dylan for the The Times They Are A-Changin' album cover. Forty years after Feinstein and Dylan collaborated on the project, the 160-page book will finally be released on November 4th through Simon & Schuster. "#17" finds the narrator pondering suicide and Marlon Brando, while "#21" has the narrator attending the funeral. Hollywood Foto-Rhetoric is Dylan's latest foray into literature: Dylan wrote a Beat poetry-styled novel in 1966 entitled Tartantula, as well as his own autobiography Chronicles, Vol. 1 in 2004. Simon & Schuster, who also published Chronicles said back in April that Dylan has begun work on the book's second volume.

Related Stories:
Bob Dylan Visits the Sixties and the Present at First-Ever Brooklyn Show
Bob Dylan's Eighth "Bootleg Series" Release, Tell Tale Signs, Due in October
Bob Dylan Speaks Out For Barack Obama

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Song Stories

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