.

Jazz Guitar Pioneer Pete Cosey Dead at 68

Guitarist performed with Miles Davis, Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf

June 11, 2012 2:30 PM ET
Pete Cosey
Pete Cosey performs at Iridium Jazz Club in New York City.
Brian Killian/WireImage

Blues and jazz guitarist Pete Cosey died on May 30th in Chicago at the age of 68, the Associated Press reports. According to Cosey's daughter Mariama, he passed away due to complications from an unspecified surgery.

Cosey is best known for his work as part of the Miles Davis Band between 1973 and 1975. In that time, he performed on four of Davis' most experimental works, Get Up with It, Dark Magus, Agharta and Pangaea. Cosey's work in this period was notable for a distinctive distorted guitar tone that added a touch of menace to his parts.

Prior to his work with Davis, Cosey was a member of the Chess Records studio band, and performed on notable records such as Muddy Waters' Electric Mud and Howlin' Wolf's Howlin' Wolf Album. Cosey also collaborated with Etta James and Chuck Berry.

Later in his career, Cosey returned to Davis' music as a member of Thee Children of Agharta, a group focused on performing Davis' electric repertoire.

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