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Black Sabbath Top U.K. Chart for the First Time in 43 Years

Band sets record for longest gap between Number One albums

Ozzy Osbourne of Black Sabbath performs in Leicestershire, England.
Kevin Nixon/Classic Rock Magazine via Getty Images
June 17, 2013 11:55 AM ET

Black Sabbath have topped the U.K. albums chart for the first time in nearly 43 years, setting a record for the longest gap between Number One albums. The band's latest, 13entered the Official U.K. Albums Chart in the top spot, 42 years and eight months after their second album, Paranoid, reached Number One in 1970.

With 13's Number One debut, Sabbath has surpassed Bob Dylan's 38-year gap between the chart-topping releases New Morning in 1970 and Together Through Life in 2009; and Rod Stewart's 37 years between 1976's A Night on the Town and current album Time.

100 Greatest Artists: Black Sabbath

"It's great! But Rod's the same as us, we've got something other people haven't got," Ozzy Osbourne said in NME. "It's all manufactured bullshit these days. But the likes of Rod, and Elton John and us have got something different. We know our craft."

The last time Black Sabbath were on the charts was last summer when the band's "best-of" compilation reached Number 27. Liam Gallagher's band, Beady Eye, followed behind Black Sabbath this week, landing their new album Be at Number Two  

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