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Black Sabbath on a Follow-Up to '13': 'Never Say Never'

Ozzy Osbourne: 'I wouldn't mind doing another Sabbath' LP

June 7, 2013 9:50 AM ET
Geezer Butler of Black Sabbath performs in San Francisco, California.
Geezer Butler of Black Sabbath performs in San Francisco, California.
Tim Mosenfelder/WireImage

It took 35 years for Ozzy Osbourne to reunite with Black Sabbath and release a new album, and bassist Geezer Butler says it just might not be the heavy metal pioneers' final bow: "Well, I guess you should never say never," Butler told Billboard. "It could be, though. We'll see how this album goes, see what happens."

Out June 11th, 13 is the first Sabbath studio album since Forbidden in 1995 and the first to feature original frontman Ozzy Osbourne since 1978's Never Say Die!

Black Sabbath Offer Taste of New Album With 'God Is Dead?'

"Let's put it this way," Osbourne added, "it's taken us 35 years to do this one. So if there's gonna be [another] album there's gonna be an album but I don't want to say if there's going to be a follow-up. I wouldn't mind doing another Sabbath album with them, though."

The new album – which is now streaming on iTunes – was produced by Rick Rubin and features Rage Against the Machine's Brad Wilk on drums after Bill Ward left the band last year. Sabbath has already played a handful of dates in Australia, New Zealand and Japan, and are set to kick off a North American tour on July 25th in Houston.

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