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Black Rebel Motorcycle Club Recover From Loss on 'Specter at the Feast' - Album Premiere

Rockers' sixth studio album pays tribute to singer's father

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club
James Minchin
March 12, 2013 9:00 AM ET

The Los Angeles rock trio Black Rebel Motorcycle Club poured their hearts into their sixth album, Specter at the Feast, which is set for release on March 19th. From smooth, melodic tracks like "Lullaby" to the powerful driving beat and wailing guitar of "Rival" and the head-banging metal on "Teenage Disease," the record charts the varied sounds the band have adopted during their 15-year career.

Specter at the Feast is made even more impactful by the story of its creation. In 2010, the band suffered a major loss: lead singer Robert Been's father, sound engineer Michael Been, passed away backstage at a BRMC show. The band used the recording process of the album as a release for their pain. "It was kind of this therapeutic process," said Been in a statement. "It really helped us pull out of that darkest place that we were in."

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club Return From Tragedy on New Album

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club will begin their U.S. tour in San Francisco on April 22nd.

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