.

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club Recover From Loss on 'Specter at the Feast' - Album Premiere

Rockers' sixth studio album pays tribute to singer's father

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club
James Minchin
March 12, 2013 9:00 AM ET

The Los Angeles rock trio Black Rebel Motorcycle Club poured their hearts into their sixth album, Specter at the Feast, which is set for release on March 19th. From smooth, melodic tracks like "Lullaby" to the powerful driving beat and wailing guitar of "Rival" and the head-banging metal on "Teenage Disease," the record charts the varied sounds the band have adopted during their 15-year career.

Specter at the Feast is made even more impactful by the story of its creation. In 2010, the band suffered a major loss: lead singer Robert Been's father, sound engineer Michael Been, passed away backstage at a BRMC show. The band used the recording process of the album as a release for their pain. "It was kind of this therapeutic process," said Been in a statement. "It really helped us pull out of that darkest place that we were in."

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club Return From Tragedy on New Album

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club will begin their U.S. tour in San Francisco on April 22nd.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“American Girl”

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers | 1976

It turns out that a single with "American" in its title--recorded on the Fourth of July during the nation's Bicentennial, no less--can actually sell better in Britain. Coupled with the Heartbreakers' flair for Byrds jangle and Animals hooks, though, is Tom Petty's native-Florida drawl that keeps this classic grounded at home. Petty dispelled rumors that the song was about a suicidal student, explaining that the inspiration came from when he was 25 and used to salute the highway traffic outside his apartment window. "It sounded like the ocean to me," he recalled. "That was my ocean. My Malibu. Where I heard the waves crash, but it was just the cars going by."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com