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Black Keys Settle Infringement Lawsuits Against Pizza Hut, Home Depot

No details on settlements revealed in court filings

Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys
David Wolff-Patrick/Redferns via Getty Images
November 27, 2012 5:20 PM ET

The Black Keys have settled copyright infringement lawsuits with both Pizza Hut and the Home Depot over the misuse of two El Camino tracks – "Gold on the Ceiling" and "Lonely Boy," respectively – in commercials for the companies, the Associated Press reports.

The rock duo filed the claims in June, after which both companies denied copying the songs. A settlement with Home Depot was reached earlier this month, however. Attorneys for the band told a Los Angeles federal judge on Monday that they'd reached an agreement with Pizza Hut.

The Rise of the Black Keys

No details of either settlement were included in the court filings, and neither company has made a statement regarding the settlement.

Over the summer, Black Keys started working on the follow-up to El Camino and hope to release it next year. "We never know what's going to happen," guitarist Dan Auerbach told Rolling Stone of the band's recording process. "We don't talk about it. We don't plan it. We start recording, and then all of a sudden, it starts to take shape and we have an idea."

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Song Stories

“Bird on a Wire”

Leonard Cohen | 1969

While living on the Greek island of Hydra, Cohen was battling a lingering depression when his girlfriend handed him a guitar and suggested he play something. After spotting a bird on a telephone wire, Cohen wrote this prayer-like song of guilt. First recorded by Judy Collins, it would be performed numerous times by artists incuding Johnny Cash, Joe Cocker and Rita Coolidge. "I'm always knocked out when I hear my songs covered or used in some situation," Cohen told Rolling Stone. "I've never gotten over the fact that people out there like my music."

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