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Billy Corgan on John Mayer: "He's Trying to Destroy His Career"

March 11, 2010 12:03 PM ET

After reading John Mayer's controversial recent interviews, Billy Corgan is convinced Mayer is trying to self-destruct. "He's trying to destroy his career," Corgan told Rolling Stone's Brian Hiatt in an interview outtake from RS' revealing new Corgan feature in the new issue, on sale now. "Rather than take a year off or change his musical direction... some part of it is irritating his soul to the point where he's trying to blow it up. Certainly a talented guy, but empathetically, standing on the sidelines, it's hard to watch someone literally burn their career to the ground — speaking as somebody who's done it."

Corgan also responded to Mayer's comments on their mutual friend Jessica Simpson ("sexual napalm," Mayer called her). "As far as it pertains to her. I think for any person who has celebrity to sort of drop rocks at somebody else's feet like that — there's things you should really just keep your mouths shut on. There's things that should just be left alone."

Related Stories:
Billy Corgan on Pumpkins' Split, "Loving" Jessica Simpson: Preview the Story
John Mayer in His Own Words: Bonus Q&A From Our Cover Story

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Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

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