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Bill Clinton Sought Led Zeppelin Reunion for Sandy Benefit

Former president tried to tap rockers for '12-12-12' concert

Bill Clinton, Robert Plant of Led Zeppelin.
Kevin Winter/Getty Images for GLAAD; Dave J Hogan/Getty Images
May 6, 2013 1:10 PM ET

Even a former president couldn't bring Led Zeppelin back together: Bill Clinton approached the rockers about reuniting for the "12-12-12" Hurricane Sandy benefit last year, but group turned down the request. According to a 60 Minutes Overtime segment, David Saltzman of the Robin Hood Foundation – the recipients of the "12-12-12" benefit – and film executive Harvey Weinstein flew to Washington D.C. to sound out Clinton on the idea.

Robert Plant Hints He'd Be Open to Led Zeppelin Reunion

The 42nd president met with surviving Led Zeppelin surviving members Robert Plant, John Paul Jones and Jimmy Page in Washington when the band was in town for the Kennedy Center Honors. Though Clinton made his plea, the band simply said no.

Plant, Jones and Page reunited for one show at London's O2 Arena on December 10th, 2007, with Jason Bonham filling in on drums for his late father, John Bonham. Page and Jones were willing to tour afterward, but Plant was disinterested. Page and Jones considered finding a replacement but eventually ditched their plans. Page told Rolling Stone last November that Plant "was busy," though Plant suggested in February that he'd be open to a reunion next year.

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