.

Beyonce Super Bowl Set List Details Emerge

Singer will open solo set with 'Crazy in Love' before Destiny's Child reunion

Beyonce
Lloyd Bishop/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images
January 25, 2013 8:25 AM ET

New details have emerged about what songs Beyoncé will perform during the halftime show at this year's Super Bowl, with Us Weekly reporting that the singer will open a solo set with "Crazy in Love" before Michelle Williams and Kelly Rowland join her for a Destiny's Child reunion.

The three will perform a medley of some of their biggest hits, including "Bills, Bills, Bills" and "Survivor," before ending with "Nuclear," a new track appearing on the upcoming compilation Love Songs. Beyoncé is said to be closing the show with the premiere of a track from her next album.

From the Archives: Destiny's Child Grow Up (2004)

The singer appeared earlier this week at President Obama's second inauguration, where she created a furor by apparently lip-syncing the national anthem to a version of the song she recorded with the Marine Band the weekend before the swearing-in. 

Destiny's Child released five studio albums in an on-again, off-again career dating back to 1990. Beyoncé's next album, which is expected sometime this year, will be her fifth solo release.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Stillness Is the Move”

Dirty Projectors | 2009

A Wim Wenders film and a rapper inspired the Dirty Projectors duo David Longstreth and Amber Coffmanto write "sort of a love song." "We rented the movie Wings of Desire from Dave's brother's recommendation, and he had me go through it and just write down some things that I found interesting, and they made it into the song," Coffman said. As for the hip-hop connection, Longstreth explained, "The beat is based on T-Pain. We commissioned a radio mix of the song by the guy who mixes all of Timbaland's records, but the mix we made sounded way better, so we didn't use it."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com