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Best New Bands of 2010: Free Energy, Grace Potter and the Nocturnals and Five More

March 17, 2010 2:55 PM ET

Rolling Stone's new issue, on sale today, includes a special feature on the hottest new bands of 2010, from Philly power-pop group Free Energy to stoner Atlanta MC B.o.B. We asked all seven acts to snap candid photos on the road and compiled the best shots here:
The Best New Bands of 2010's Most Candid Shots From the Road

Keep reading for a quick dossier on all the artists. Plus, check out the exclusive premiere of Grace Potter and the Nocturnals' new video for "Tiny Light," which was directed by Paul Minor (Muse, Queens of the Stone Age):

Free Energy: Philly power poppers who mine the best of glammy Seventies-style arena jams on their James Murphy-produced debut Stuck on Nothing.

The Dirty Heads: Cali surf bros who revive Sublime-style reggae rock, rapping and harmonizing on their April disc Any Port in a Storm.

B.o.B.: Atlanta-bred rapper signed by T.I. whose eccentric loves (Animal Collective, collecting crystals, gospel) create a fascinating mix on The Adventures of Bobby Ray.

Grace Potter and the Nocturnals: Rowdy blues road warriors fronted by singer-organist Potter, who learned to appreciate the wonders of acid at the tender age of 12.

Titus Andronicus: Jersey punks with an intellectual streak — their latest LP The Monitor is a concept album about the Civil War.

Neon Indian: 21-year-old Alan Palomo, a laptop virtuoso who's become the face of "glo-fi" thanks to the dreamy keys on Psychic Chasms.

Mumford & Sons: Acoustic U.K. folk band whose old-timey folk-rock is inspired by mythology and bluegrass.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

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