.

Beck Returns to 'Sea Change' Vibe for February LP 'Morning Phase'

Album will be singer/songwriter's first for new label Capitol

Beck performs in Newport, Rhode Island.
Douglas Mason/Getty Images
October 28, 2013 10:05 PM ET

After nearly five and a half years, Beck is set to return with his 12th studio album, Morning Phase. The new collection is due out in February on his new label, Capitol Records. It's his first album since 2008's Modern Guilt and is said to be a return to his Sea Change days, where he explored dissolving love through a collection of heartwrenching, slow acoustic numbers. Many of the same musicians that played on that album appear on Morning Phase, including longtime collaborator Smokey Hormel.

See Where Beck's 'Sea Change' Ranks on Our 100 Best Albums of the 2000s

As was previously teased, Beck's new album has been in the works for some time; he slowly came out of hiding over the last year, starting with 2012's Song Reader, an "album" of sheet music he released with McSweeney's. In February he recreated David Bowie's "Sound + Vision," and over the summer played a handful of headlining shows that mostly revisited that acoustic vibe. He also released three folky singles: "Defriended," "I Won't Be Long" and "Gimme." 

Next month, Beck will play three South American shows in Santiago, Chile (November 7th), San Paolo, Brazil (Noveember 9th), and Buenos Aires, Argentina (November 14th).

 

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Nightshift”

The Commodores | 1984

The year after soul legends Marvin Gaye and Jackie Wilson died, songwriter Dennis Lambert asked members of the Commodores to give him a tape of ideas. "And the one from Walter Orange has this wonderful bass line," said co-writer Franne Golde. "Plus the lyric, 'Marvin, he was a friend of mine' ... Within 10 minutes, we had decided it should be something like a modern R&B version of 'Rock 'n' Roll Heaven,' and I just said, 'Nightshift.'" This tribute to the recently deceased musicians was the band's only hit without Lionel Richie, who had left for a solo career.

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com