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Beatles to iTunes "Stalled," Says McCartney

November 24, 2008 4:38 PM ET

Still wondering when the Beatles' catalog will finally make it to iTunes? Don't hold your breath, as Paul McCartney told a press conference today in London that negotiations between Apple Records and EMI have "stalled." "When it's something as big as the Beatles, it's heavy negotiations," Macca said. "We're [the band members and their estates] very for it, but there are a couple of sticking points. It's stalled. No change there then!" McCartney didn't elaborate on the supposed stumbling blocks, but past theories range from iTunes' strict 99 cent a la carte song fee — which upsets pretty much all the major labels — to the much-needed remastering of the catalog. Back in March, a deal between the Beatles and iTunes seemed imminent, especially considering the solo careers of all Fab Four members are on Apple's download service, but with McCartney's announcement, we'd hold off from including a download of Revolver as a Christmas present.

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The Beatles' MP3s: iTunes, McCartney Reportedly Strike $400 Million Deal

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Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

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