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Beastie Boys Give Fans Music Therapy

March 5, 2008 6:01 PM ET

Adam Yauch, Mike Diamond and Adam Horovitz played a benefit on New York's West Side last night for the Institute for Music and Neurologic Function, a Bronx-based agency dedicated to the idea that "music has unique powers to heal, rehabilitate, and inspire."

"I had wanted to do this one charity for my cousin who had gotten shot in the leg 15 times," said Yauch before the show. "But these guys wouldn't do it."

"It's weird that he got shot only in the leg that excessively," said Horovitz. "That's a lot of shots."

On a serious note, Diamond added: "It just seemed like amazing work that [the IMNF is] doing out there in the Bronx. And it's also work that doesn't get much attention and it's helping people in need."

The show itself was a mix of classic Beasties hip-hop, punk and instrumental songs (highlights: "3 MC's and One DJ," "Rhymin' and Stealin'," and "B for My Name"). This weekend the trio plays Florida's Langerado Festival and their first-ever gig in Mexico City; as reported on RollingStone.com, they're also back in the studio.

Related Stories:
Beastie Boys Back in Studio; More on Adam Yauch's Film Biz
M.I.A. Video for "Paper Planes": Uncut, With Gunshots and Beastie Boys Cameo Intact
Beastie Boys Open and Close With Brooklyn Anthems at First-Ever Show In the New York Borough

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Song Stories

“Santa Monica”

Everclear | 1996

After his brother and girlfriend both died of drug overdoses, Art Alexakis -- depressed and hooked on drugs himself -- jumped off the Santa Monica Pier in California, determined to die. "It was really stupid," said the Everclear frontman, who would further explore his personal emotional journey in the song "Father of Mine." "I went under the water. Then I said, 'I don't wanna die.'" The song, declaring "Let's swim out past the breakers/and watch the world die," was intended as a manifesto for change, Alexakis said. "Let the world do what it's gonna do and just live on our own."

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