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B.o.B Follows Hot 100 Streak With Number One Album

Bullet for My Valentine, Melissa Etheridge enter the Top 10, Hole debuts at 15

May 5, 2010 1:03 PM ET

In the span of just a few months, B.o.B has gone from being one of Rolling Stone's Best New Artists of 2010 to Billboard 200 top seller: The stoner MC's debut album The Adventures of Bobby Ray hit Number One its first week on shelves, selling 84,000 copies according to Nielsen SoundScan. Billboard.biz reports that B.o.B has become the first male artist since Rick Ross in 2006 to land atop the Billboard 200 with his debut album in its debut week. As Rolling Stone previously reported, B.o.B has also topped the Hot 100 for two straight weeks with "Nothin' on You."

Lady Antebellum's Need You Now stayed strong at Number Two once again while Bullet for My Valentine enjoyed their best debut yet as Fever entered the chart at Number Three with 71,000 copies sold. Melissa Etheridge's latest, Fearless Love, also scored a Top 10 debut, coming at Number Seven, followed by Miranda Cosgrove's Sparks Fly at Eight. Last week's champion, Glee's The Power of Madonna soundtrack, dropped to tenth place. Courtney Love's new Hole album Nobody's Daughter missed the Top 10 entirely, premiering at Number 15 with 22,000 albums sold.

B.o.B's accomplishment comes with some deflating news, however: For the third straight week, the Number One album failed to surpass 100,000 copies sold, marking the longest such stretch since February 2009.

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