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Avril Lavigne, Deryck Whibley Split After Three-Year Marriage

September 17, 2009 2:56 PM ET

It seemed like a marriage made in Canadian Sk8er Boi heaven, but the three-year union of Avril Lavigne and Sum 41's Deryck Whibley has reportedly come to an end. According to Us Weekly, Lavigne "dumped him and told him she was leaving him. She wants to move on," a source said, adding "Divorce papers will be filed any day now." Lavigne also reportedly forced Whibley to vacate the couple's $9.5 million house in California. Lavigne and Whibley began dating in February 2004 and became engaged in July of 2005. A year later, they were married in a ceremony in Montecito, California.

The news comes just as Lavigne wraps up work on her next studio album, expected out sometime in November. In a recent Rolling Stone In the Studio, Lavigne revealed that she and Whibley recorded the majority of her new album in their home studio "in our sweats." "Life, that's what this record is about," Lavigne told RS. "It's so easy for me to do a boy-bashing pop song, but to sit down and write honestly about something that's really close to me, something I've been through, it's a totally different thing."

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