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Avicii Takes the Floor on 'You Make Me' Remix - Song Premiere

Rising EDM producer Throttle chops it up

December 19, 2013 9:00 AM ET
Avicii
Avicii
Alex Wessely

In a little more than three years, Sweden's Avicii has become one of the biggest names in dance music. Even though the producer/DJ has released dozens of songs over the past few years, it wasn't until September of this year that he released his first studio album, True, which, quite blasphemously, merged bluegrass with electronic music. But it also included the more traditional, dance-floor-ready "You Make Me," which prominently featured the vocals of a fellow Swede, the soul-crooner Salem Al Fakir. Now that the year is winding down, Avicii is capping it off with a remix of "You Make Me" by rising EDM producer Throttle.

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Throttle's mix retains the song's central character; it's still meant to be a soundtrack to booty shaking, built off a pumping beat and Al Fakir's revelatory chorus. Now, however, a metallic wind rushes between the rhythm and Al Fakir's voice, giving it a combustible character. When the storm comes to a head, the song erupts into an Eighties-style synth-driven break beat. Throughout the rest of the song, Throttle experiments with the contrast between the ambient and the percussive, alternately letting the swirling synths and thumping beats take center stage, and showing just how malleable the dance floor can be.

True is out now, and Avicii hits Australia in January.

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