Aubrie Sellers on 'Garage Country,' 'Trashy' Drums and Famous Mom

Buzzed-about singer, the daughter of Lee Ann Womack, finds a new sound for her debut album 'New City Blues'

Aubrie Sellers on 'Garage Country,' 'Trashy' Drums and Famous Mom

With the release of New City Blues, Aubrie Sellers seeks to live up to the buzz. Since bits and pieces of the record, produced by Frank Liddell (Miranda Lambert), were doled out in December, anticipation has surrounded the 24-year-old's raw brand of country music. It's a sound she's dubbed "garage country."

"It's more a reference to a certain genre and a type of sound. The drums are very trashy, it's all electric, it's very in your face and it's not perfect. It's raw, and I think that's what garage means," Sellers tells Rolling Stone Country

The daughter of country music traditionalist Lee Ann Womack, Sellers' delicate voice often calls to mind that of her mother. It's a similarity the Tennessee-and-Texas raised singer-songwriter doesn't deny. "Vocally, I sound like my mom. I don't think I can help it. That's just my natural voice. But my music is very different from hers and everything about my career path up to this point has been very different than her as well," she says. 

Sellers will open for Chris Stapleton at a Ryman Auditorium show in Nashville next month, and also appear at the Stagecoach Country Music Festival in Indio, California in April. New City Blues is available now.