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Ashley Monroe Shows Her Wild Side on 'Like a Rose' – Album Premiere

The country singer revels in heartbreak and debauchery

Ashley Monroe
Jim Wright
March 4, 2013 2:40 PM ET

Ashley Monroe of the Pistol Annies will release her solo debut, Like a Rose, March 5th on Warner Bros., and she's packed it full of backroad debauchery and heartbreak.

"They're gonna die tryin' a-track me down," Monroe sings in "Monroe Suede," as she describes life as a 14-year-old on the run in a stolen pickup truck. She hints at the struggles of an out-of-wedlock pregnancy in "Two Weeks Late" and alludes to innocence lost in "Morning After."

Ashley Monroe Entices Her Beau With 'Weed Instead of Roses'

"Give Me Weed Instead of Roses," on the other hand, makes no attempt to be coy, as Monroe aggressively rebuffs the trappings of romantic love in favor of lace, whips and chains, whipped cream and weed. She does show a softer side on "She's Driving Me Out of Your Mind," lamenting an impending breakup at the hands of another woman.

Monroe co-wrote all the songs on the album, and teamed up with fellow country crooner Vince Gill to write "You Ain't Dolly (And You Ain't Porter)," a playfully antagonistic duet she sings with Blake Shelton.

Monroe will perform the title track of the album on The Tonight Show With Jay Leno on March 11th.

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