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As I Lay Dying Singer Due in Court

Tim Lambesis could face up to nine years in prison in murder-for-hire plot

Tim Lambesis of As I Lay Dying performs in Berlin.
Frank Hoensch/Redferns via Getty Images
September 16, 2013 12:20 PM ET

As I Lay Dying frontman Tim Lambesis is due in court today to determine whether he will stand trial on charges that he tried to hire a hit man to kill his estranged wife. Prosecutors claim that the rocker paid an undercover officer $1,000 to murder his wife, who Lambesis said was making the couple's divorce impossible and making it difficult for him to see their three adopted children, The Associated Press reports. Lambesis has pleaded not guilty to solicitation for murder.

As I Lay Dying Singer Arrested in Murder-for-Hire Plot

Prosecutors allege that Lambesis gave an undercover detective a picture of his wife, her address and security gate code, in addition to dates of when he would be with the children to secure an alibi. Lambesis has been free on $2 million bail since May. 

The singer sought to end his marraige in August 2012, when he sent his wife, Meggan, an email saying that he no longer loved her and wished to end the marriage. Meggan Lambesis later learned that her husband had been having an affair. 

Lambesis' lawyer has said the singer had been using steroids for body building that had a devastating effect on his mind. 

If convicted, Lambesis faces up to nine years in prison.

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