.

Arturo Vega, Ramones Logo Designer, Dead at 65

Graphic artist was a source of support in the band's early years

Danny Fields and Arturo Vega.
Roberta Bayley/Redferns
June 10, 2013 9:40 AM ET

Arturo Vega, who designed the Ramones' iconic logo, died Saturday. He was 65. No cause of death was given. Vega's death was announced by Legs McNeil, author of Please Kill Me: The Uncensored Oral History of Punk, who was a friend.

Vega, who grew up in Chihuahua, Mexico, before moving to the U.S. in the 1970s, created the "Hey Ho Let's Go" seal that has adorned Ramones merchandise for decades. He served as the band's artistic director and, in later years, their archivist and historian. He was also an early source of support for the band. Vega befriended the musicians and let Joey and Dee Dee Ramone live in his loft on the Bowery near CBGB prior to the release of their first album.

100 Greatest Artists: The Ramones

"One of the best friends anyone could ever hope for," McNeil wrote on Facebook. "I knew and hung out with Arturo since 1976 – 37 fucking years, if my math is correct – and if it weren't for Arturo – Joey and I would've starved to death in those early years."

McNeil continued, "Artie was so fucking fun – he made every thing into an adventure. The world just became a much colder and lonelier place – as if it wasn't getting that way already. Fuck, I miss him so much already."

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Try a Little Tenderness”

Otis Redding | 1966

This pop standard had been previously recorded by dozens of artists, including by Bing Crosby 33 years before Otis Redding, who usually wrote his own songs, cut it. It was actually Sam Cooke’s 1964 take, which Redding’s manager played for Otis, that inspired the initially reluctant singer to take on the song. Isaac Hayes, then working as Stax Records’ in-house producer, handled the arrangement, and Booker T. and the MG’s were the backing band. Redding’s soulful version begins quite slowly and tenderly itself before mounting into a rousing, almost religious “You’ve gotta hold her, squeeze her …” climax. “I did that damn song you told me to do,” Redding told his manager. “It’s a brand new song now.”

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com