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Aretha Franklin Gets Hospital Visit From Jesse Jackson

Reverend says singer is 'recovering, and her spirits are high'

December 6, 2010 2:45 PM ET
Aretha Franklin
Jemal Countess/Getty

The Reverend Jesse Jackson visited Aretha Franklin in Detroit on Friday, the day after her successful surgery.

Jackson described Franklin, 68, as "recovering, and her spirits are high. She's doing very well. She's very prayerful. She's a woman full of deep religious faith."

Franklin announced her surgery's success Thursday. "God is still in control," she said in a statement. "I had superb doctors and nurses whom were blessed by all the prayers of the city and the country." On Wednesday, fans in Detroit held a vigil for her.

Read Mary J. Blige's tribute to Aretha

Franklin has been in and out of the hospital since the summer. In August, she canceled two New York shows after breaking two ribs in a fall. She had a brief hospital stay late in October, for undisclosed reasons, and said at the time that she was eager to get back on the road. However, just days later she canceled all of her concert dates through May under doctors' orders.

Aretha Franklin Gets Visit from Jesse Jackson [Detroit News]

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