.

Arcade Fire Release Two New Songs, Announce August LP 'The Suburbs'

Montreal collective nearly done recording new disc: "We're in the homestretch!"

May 27, 2010 1:13 PM ET

Arcade Fire revealed on their official website today that they will release their third album The Suburbs on August 3rd, giving fans just three days to familiarize themselves with the material before the Montreal collective's headlining set at this year's Lollapalooza. As Rolling Stone previously reported, Arcade Fire had posted half-minute snippets of the album's title track and "Month of May," but with the limited-edition 12" single now out in select record stores, both songs are available for purchase on their site.

"We're pretty much done with our new album," Arcade Fire wrote in a handwritten letter that appears on their site. "The homestretch!" (The album is available for pre-order in a variety of formats.) The band has also posted the lyrics to "The Suburbs" in a "click and drag" style that resembles refrigerator magnets. Expect a new music video to pop up soon. As Rolling Stone previously reported, Arcade Fire and director Spike Jonze recently collaborated on a short film inspired by the album's title track. Filmed in Austin, Texas last month, the short film reportedly revolves around a cast of teenagers in a story of "friends growing apart," which seems to echo the theme and lyrics of "The Suburbs."

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com