.

Animal Collective Premiere Trippy "Brother Sport" Video

January 8, 2010 12:00 AM ET

The video for Animal Collective's "Brother Sport," the epic closing track from Merriweather Post Pavilion, was unveiled this morning on the band's My Animal Home Website. Much like MPP itself, the "Brother Sport" video is a kaleidoscopic odyssey, featuring psychedelic animations, children straight out of Where the Wild Things Are running around meadows, neon interludes and the most insane Easter Egg painting session ever, all paced to the tribal beat of the six-and-a-half minute track. Watch it above.

"Brother Sport" is the third single off MPP, following "Summertime Clothes" and "My Girls," which produced such a mind-blowing music video that even Kanye West took a break from his Caps Lock rants to embed it into his blog. Merriweather Post Pavilion also featured on Rolling Stone's list of the 25 Best Albums of 2009, while "My Girls" placed on our 25 Best Songs of 2009. In 2009, AC busted out into the mainstream, also appearing on both the album and song lists in our Readers' 2009 Poll.

Related Stories:
New Music Report: Animal Collective's "Fall Be Kind"
Animal Collective, Deerhunter, Sufjan Stevens Bring Lullabies and Assaults to All Tomorrow's Parties
Album Review: Animal Collective's Merriweather Post Pavilion

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Try a Little Tenderness”

Otis Redding | 1966

This pop standard had been previously recorded by dozens of artists, including by Bing Crosby 33 years before Otis Redding, who usually wrote his own songs, cut it. It was actually Sam Cooke’s 1964 take, which Redding’s manager played for Otis, that inspired the initially reluctant singer to take on the song. Isaac Hayes, then working as Stax Records’ in-house producer, handled the arrangement, and Booker T. and the MG’s were the backing band. Redding’s soulful version begins quite slowly and tenderly itself before mounting into a rousing, almost religious “You’ve gotta hold her, squeeze her …” climax. “I did that damn song you told me to do,” Redding told his manager. “It’s a brand new song now.”

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com