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Amy Winehouse's Wedding Dress Stolen

Garment has gone missing from the late singer's former home

November 1, 2012 9:15 AM ET
amy winehouse
Amy Winehouse performs during the V Festival in Telford, England.
Shirlaine Forrest/WireImage

Amy Winehouse's wedding dress has been stolen from the late singer's former home in north London, the BBC reports. Winehouse wore the dress when she married ex-husband Blake Fielder-Civil in 2007. 

After Winehouse died in 2011, her possessions were cataloged and stored at her house in Camden, and have been moved elsewhere over the past year. Her wedding dress and another dress she wore on Later . . . With Jools Holland are not thought to have been taken as a result of a burglary.

The dresses were among items slated to be sold at a fundraiser in New York next year. "People need to know they are not supposed to be out there on the market and they should not try to buy them," a spokesman for the Amy Winehouse Foundation said. The dress Winehouse wore on the cover of Back to Black sold last year for more than $64,000 and another of her dresses sold for more than $48,000, the spokesman said, speculating that her wedding dress could have fetched as much as $160,000 for the foundation.

London's Metropolitan Police say they have yet to receive a formal report of the thefts.

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