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Coroner: Amy Winehouse Died From Alcohol Poisoning

Singer was over five times the legal drunk-driving limit

October 26, 2011 9:15 AM ET
Mitch Winehouse, the father of Amy Winehouse, and her stepmother Jane leave St. Pancras Coroner's Court on October 26th, 2011
Mitch Winehouse, the father of Amy Winehouse, and her stepmother Jane leave St. Pancras Coroner's Court on October 26th, 2011
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

A coroner has ruled that Amy Winehouse died as the unintended result of drinking too much alcohol. According to pathology reports, Winehouse had consumed a "very large quantity of alcohol" and was more than five times over the legal drunk-driving limit in Britain at the time of her death. As a result, her passing has been ruled a "death by misadventure."

Winehouse, who struggled with alcoholism and drug abuse for much of her adult life, was found dead at her home in London on July 23rd. She was 27 years old.

Related
Amy Winehouse's Death: A Troubled Star Gone Too Soon
Musicians Respond to Amy Winehouse's Death
• Photos: Amy Winehouse Remembered
• Photos: The Tumultuous Life Of Amy Winehouse
The Diva and Her Demons: Rolling Stone's 2007 Amy Winehouse Cover Story
Up All Night With Amy Winehouse: Rolling Stone's 2008 Story
• Video: Behind the Feature: Claire Hoffman on Interviewing Amy Winehouse
• Photos: Not Fade Away: Amy Winehouse and More Rockers Lost Before Their Time

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