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'American Idol'-Based Movie in the Works: "The Musical Version of 'Rocky'"

August 2, 2007 11:50 AM ET

American Idol's first attempt to cash in at the box office didn't go so well, to put it mildly. From Justin to Kelly, 2003's painful teenage-romance flick starring season-one finalists Justin Guarini and Kelly Clarkson, was a rush-job that tanked its first week out and was then rushed to DVD. Simon Cowell was not involved in this nightmare, and is therefore still optimistic that he can coax American Idol's massive audience from their couches to theaters with Star Struck, a new film he's been planning for years.

The movie's plot is a hybrid of a fictionalized American Idol-like show and Alan Parker's 1980s' film Fame. Star Struck follows the lives of ten celebrity-hungry contestants as they pursue their fifteen minutes. "The story is told through the eyes of those ten contestants," Cowell explained. "We want it to be the musical version of Rocky -- an underdog story, a feel-good film. Fame was all about young people wanting to be famous, and in order to do that, they enrolled in a drama school; everyone who wants to be famous today signs up for American Idol."

To further the life-imitating-art-imitating-reality narrative, Star Struck will be cast via nationally held auditions and the film will open with Cowell presiding over potential candidates, just like those nauseatingly compelling first weeks of Idol. Cowell is aiming for a summer 2008 release date.

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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