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Allman Brothers Band's Rare Version of 'Statesboro Blues' - Premiere

Swampy take recorded during first Beacon residency in 1992

The Allman Brothers Band
Kirk West
January 8, 2014 9:00 AM ET

This year marks the 45th anniversary of the Allman Brothers Band, and the band will celebrate by returning to the Beacon Theatre for 10 shows beginning March 7th. "These last few years, we do the Beacon and then we do one month on the road in the summertime and that's about it," says Gregg Allman. "And then everybody goes off to their own respective solo bands. It's getting more seldom that we get together, you know? It makes you really look forward to it."

See Where the Allman Brothers Rank on Our List of the 100 Greatest Artists

The band will also celebrate with multiple archival releases. This searing take of "Statesboro Blues" will hit shelves as part of Play All Night: Live at the Beacon Theatre 1992 (out February 18th), a two-disc set taken from the band's very first Beacon residency. "That night contained a particularly swampy version of 'Statesboro Blues': different from the famed [1971's At Fillmore East] version, but reminiscent nonetheless," says Warren Haynes, who had recently joined the band at the time of the shows. Adds Gregg Allman, "It's a good boogie. You know, people like it. It's got soul, you know what I mean?"

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