Alabama Shakes' Brittany Howard Releases New LP as Thunderbitch

No-nonsense rock singer drops self-titled debut four months after 'Sound and Color'

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Brittany Howard
Alabama Shakes singer Brittany Howard follows up the band's lauded 'Sound and Color' with a bare-bones new rock LP under the name Thunderbitch

Brittany Howard has wasted no time following up Alabama Shakes' remarkable new record, Sound and Color, releasing an 10-track, self-titled new LP under the moniker Thunderbitch, Fuse reports.

Thunderbitch is available to stream in full on the band's website, while a vinyl copy is available to purchase for $15 via Alabama Shakes' merch shop. Digital copies are available via iTunes for $8.

The band has also offered up a brash promo clip featuring the opening moments of album cut "Heavenly Feeling." To the intermittent strums of a Link Wray-esque guitar, a gang of face-painted punks amass in an empty field sipping Pabst Blue Ribbon and canoodling. When the track kicks in, so does the bacchanalia, complete with mass makeouts and a burning couch.

Along with Howard, Thunderbitch comprises members of fellow Nashville acts Fly Golden Eagle and Clear Plastic Masks. The group first surfaced in 2012, reports Nashville Scene, playing a gig in a hot wings joint not long after Alabama Shakes scored several Grammy nominations for their breakout album, Boys and Girls.

Thunderbitch has not confirmed any live shows, however, noting on the Tour section of their website, "Maybe someday….?"

Howard will return to the road with Alabama Shakes this fall, starting September 17th at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts in Philadelphia. The band will tour North America throughout the month, finishing with an October 3rd set at the Austin City Limits Music Festival. A European trek will follow in November.

While Thunderbitch proudly proclaims in their bio, "Rock 'n' roll. The end," Howard and Alabama Shakes explored the far reaches of the genre on Sound and Color. During an interview with Rolling Stone, Howard said she was listening to everything from Roberta Flack to the E.T. soundtrack, saying of the LP: "It's a bit far-out. When it came time to gather all the songs, we thought, 'What kind of record is this?' And we said, 'Very strange.' But I love it."

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