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Akon 'Disagrees' With Will.I.Am's Criticism of Michael Jackson LP

I don't see anything disrespectful about it,' Akon says

November 16, 2010 1:49 PM ET

Will.I.Am has loudly voiced his opposition to Michael, the forthcoming posthumous Michael Jackson LP, calling its release "disrespectful." But Akon, who collaborated with Jackson on the just-released "Hold My Hand" single, disagrees.

"I think that's probably Will's thing," Akon told TMZ. "Me, personally, I think it's keeping the legacy alive. I don't see anything disrespectful about it.

"These albums would have come out if [Jackson] was alive or dead," he continued, "so I think this helps to keep his legacy alive. I honestly disagree with [Will]."

Check Out All of Rolling Stone's coverage in "Michael Jackson Remembered."

Akon said that working with Jackson was "really a dream come true of mine."

Will, who worked with Jackson in 2006, sounded off about the album last week, questioning how posthumous material by an artist as meticulous as MJ could ever be released.

"Michael Jackson songs are finished when Michael says they're finished," Will said. "Maybe if I never worked with him I wouldn't have this perspective. He was very particular about how he wanted his vocals, the reverb he used ... he was that hands-on."

Will added that the songs he worked on with Jackson will never see the light of day. "He kept his vocals and I kept the music," he said. "We had that understanding."

Akon: Will.i.am Is WRONG About MJ Album [TMZ]

Black Eyed Peas' will.i.am criticizes Sony for releasing new Michael Jackson album: 'It's disrespectful' [Entertainment Weekly]

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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