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AC/DC Singer Johnson Putting "Thoughts And Anecdotes" Into New Book

December 22, 2008 10:10 AM ET

AC/DC singer Brian Johnson has something to do during downtime on the band's Black Ice tour: The vocalist has signed a deal with Penguin Books to pen his memoirs, a collection of "thoughts and anecdotes" he's compiled in his years as the singer of the Australian band. Don't expect a tawdry tale like Motley Crue's The Dirt, however, as Johnson's 300-page manuscript will have a different tone. "I like humor a lot," Johnson said, "and cars have been a big part of my life. I'm lucky enough that I'm able to buy some of the exotic ones. Instead of doing drugs, I did motorcars. I'm not sure which one is more expensive." Stories in the book will likely include Johnson's debut ride in a Concorde jet, his first auto race and that time he drove backwards for 9 1/2 miles because his gears were busted. No title or print date has been announced yet.

Related Stories:
Why "Black Ice" Beat "Chinese Democracy": The Tale of Wal-Mart Vs. Best Buy
AC/DC Turn "Rock N Roll Train" Into World's First Excel Video
AC/DC Return to the Road With Same Old Awesome Song and Dance

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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