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50 Cent: 'I Don't Think I'm Gonna Live Much Longer'

Rapper tweets that he has lost faith, will not promote music

January 3, 2012 5:05 PM ET
50 cent
Curtis '50 Cent' Jackson attends the XXL Magazine Year End issue release party at Webster Hall in New York.
Johnny Nunez/WireImage

Judging by his recent comments on Twitter, rapper 50 Cent is not feeling optimistic. "I don't think I'm gonna live much longer," he wrote during a series of tweets that began yesterday. Earlier today, he clarified the remark: "To be conscious that life is short is not suicidal," he wrote. "I'm good if I die tonight."

The rapper also claimed that he has "lost all the faith in the team I'm on. I have nothing left to say. I will not be promoting my music." The comment comes after months of discord between the artist and Interscope Records, who are expecting the delivery of his next album. Last month, 50 Cent released the self-produced mixtape The Big 10, marking the 10-year anniversary of 50 Cent Is the Future.

If he's disillusioned with the music industry, he has plenty to keep himself busy. Most recently, 50 has been concentrating on promoting Street King, his new energy drink, proceeds of which are earmarked to fight world hunger. At an event last month for the launch of his new line of headphones, 50 Cent talked to Rolling Stone about signing Jersey Shore's Pauly D to G-Note Records.   

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