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2 Live Crew to Reunite

The controversial 90s rap group will be touring this summer

January 22, 2012 6:52 PM ET
2 Live Crew
2 Live Crew during the 1990 MTV Video Music Awards in Los Angeles.
Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic

2 Live Crew, the rap group famous for lewd party hits such as "Me So Horny," has reunited and will be touring this summer.

Rapper and producer Luther Campbell announced the news on Saturday at the Sundance Film Festival, where he is promoting a short film called The Life and Freaky Times of Uncle Luke.

2 Live Crew’s 1989 album As Nasty as They Wanna Be gained notoriety as the target of a national anti-obscenity campaign, which culminated in the arrest of three of the group’s members in 1990. They were soon acquitted of the obscenity charges, partly on the strength of expert testimony from Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

The controversial album ended up selling more than 2 million copies, but the group’s popularity faded with subsequent albums, and members gradually went their separate ways. 

"I just can't wait to just start practicing. That's going to be a blast,” Campbell, the 51-year old MC and recent Miami-Dade Mayoral candidate, told the Associated Press.

"We're going to perform the songs and everybody's going to be excited. Some of the older people of our generation will be able to tell their kids, 'You're staying home tonight, we're going to see 2 Live Crew and shake our booty!'"

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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