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12 Thrilling Facts About Michael Jackson's 'Thriller' Video

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6. Fred Astaire could've been a "Thriller" extra.

Hollywood legend Fred Astaire, a fan of Jackson's dancing (Jackson personally taught him to moonwalk), attended a "Thriller" rehearsal. Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, who edited Jackson's Moonwalk autobiography, logged some serious hours: When they were filming at 3 A.M. in a bad neighborhood in east Los Angeles, she was hanging out in Jackson's Winnebago. 

Fred Sabine/NBCU Photo Bank

7. The "Thiller" choreographer was a "Beat It" gang member.

Choreographer Michael Peters also did the epic dance sequences in Pat Benatar's "Love Is a Battlefield" and in Jackson's "Beat It" video (where he played one of the gang leaders — the one dressed in white, with sunglasses and a mustache). He won a Tony for his work on Dreamgirls and died of AIDS in 1994, at just 46 years old.

8. The appeal of zombie-dancing is global.

The largest number of people doing the "Thriller" zombie-dance routine, according to the Guinness Book of World Records: "13,597 participants in an event organised by the Instituto de la Juventud del Gobierno del Distrito Federal at the Monumento a la Revolucion, Mexico City, Mexico, on 29 Aug 2009."

9. There should not be business classes based on "Thriller."

John Landis on the motivations behind making "Thriller" and its huge financial impact: "The reality is, it was a vanity video. Everything that happened on 'Thriller' happened because Michael wanted to turn into a monster. None of it was planned. I want to make that clear, because there was a course taught at the Harvard Business School on 'Thriller,' and it was complete bullshit."

Courtesy of Sony/Legacy

10. "Thriller" may have the ability to possess you.

As a nine-year-old child, Cee Lo Green was so scared of "Thriller," he would flee the room whenever the video came on TV: "If he could be possessed, then I damn sure could be possessed, because Michael was so much stronger than I."

Art Streiber/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

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