The 50 Greatest Concerts of the Last 50 Years

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Madonna Blond Ambition Tour
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Madonna Blond Ambition Tour

As Madonna's career was taking off in the mid-Eighties, most of her tours were relatively straightforward affairs, based around her singing and dancing. But for the stadium blowouts that supported her 1989 classic, Like a Prayer, she wanted to up her game. In the process, she reinvented the pop megatour itself. "I really put a lot of myself into it," she said. "It's much more theatrical than anything I've ever done." That year, Madonna had caused a nationwide controversy with the video for "Like a Prayer," which daringly mixed sexual and religious imagery. Blond Ambition extended that provocation and upped the spectacle.

The show opened with Madonna climbing down a staircase into a factory world inspired by German expressionist filmmaker Fritz Lang. She sang in a giant cathedral for "Like a Prayer" and under a beauty-shop hair dryer in "Material Girl." And, most infamously, she simulated masturbation while wearing a cone-shaped bustier on a crimson bed during "Like a Virgin." "The Blond Ambition Tour was what really catapulted her into the stratosphere," says Vincent Paterson, the tour's co-director and choreographer.

Madonna took a hands-on approach to the show, working with her brother, painter Christopher Ciccone, to design sets, and creating the costumes with fashion designer Jean Paul Gaultier. "I tried to make the show accommodate my own short attention span," she said. "We put the songs together so there was an emotional arc in the show. I basically thought of vignettes for every song."

Starting out in Japan in April 1990 and hitting the U.S. the following month, the tour grossed almost $63 million. But it didn't go off without any complications: Madonna had to ditch the blond-ponytail hair extensions she wore early in the tour because they kept getting caught in her headset microphone. And in Toronto, the masturbation sequence almost got her and her dancers arrested in what became a bonding moment for her entire crew.

Madonna's close relationship with her collaborators would be a major theme in the blockbuster 1991 tour documentary Truth or Dare, especially in memorable scenes where she invited her backup dancers into her bed. Today, Blond Ambition's over-the-top intimacy is a staple of live pop music, from Lady Gaga to Miley Cyrus. In 1990, it was a revolution. "It was a kind of turning point," says Darryl Jones, who played bass on the tour. "A lot of young girls were watching." Steve Knopper

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