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Questlove's Top 50 Hip-Hop Songs of All Time

15

Rob Base and DJ E-Z Rock, "It Takes Two" (1988)


rob base easy rock
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15/50

For all of the James Brown/Clyde Stubblefield "Funky Drummer" sample folklore talk out there, I rarely hear conversation about the James Brown drummer who actually got sampled more than my idol Clyde did. John "Jabo" Starks was the Beatles to Clyde's Stones. A clean shuffle drummer to Clyde's free-jazz left hand. Clyde fit more with Public Enemy's pop-art-rock sporadic vision. Emphasis on everything surrounding the one beat, thus making other parts of your body shake in order to keep up with his rhythm – see "Mother Popcorn," "It's A New Day" and "Give It Up or Turn It Loose." Jabo's sparse, all-on-the-one funk was more at home with conservative soul lovers – see "Hot Pants," "Escapism" and "The Payback" – which is why it makes total sense that Clyde's panic style was the anchor to drum and bass music and other experimental styles, while Jabo was the anchor of the New Jack Swing movement. He was always reliably on the one and never, ever in the way. Jabo's go-to magnum opus was on the five-break-filled JB-produced "Think (About It)" by Lyn Collins. James' holy ghost yelp almost threatens to upstage Starks' show, but it's Starks' steady glide that gave R&B music its blueprint some 15 years after its release.


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