.

100 Greatest Guitarists

6

B.B. King

Billy Gibbons


bb king
Charlie Gillett Collection/Redferns
6/100

B.B.'s influences were set at an early stage. Being from Indianola, Mississippi, he goes back far enough to remember the sound of field hollers and the cornerstone blues figures, like Charley Patton and Robert Johnson. The single-note phrasing of T-Bone Walker was another thing. You can hear those influences in the choice of melodies that he not only sings vocally but lets his guitar sing instrumentally.

He plays in shortened bursts, with a richness and robust delivery. And there is a technical dexterity, a cleanly delivered phrasing. This was sophisticated soloing. It's so identifiable, so clear, it could be written out. John Lee Hooker – his stuff was too difficult to write out. But B.B. was a genuine soloist.

There are two things he does that I was desperate to learn. He originated this one cut-to-the-bone phrase where he hits two notes, then jumps to another string and slides up to a note. I can do it in my sleep now. And there's this twoor three-note thing, where he bends the last note. Both figures never fail to get you moving in your seat – or out of your seat. It's that powerful.

There was a turning point, around the time of [1965's] Live at the Regal, when his sound took on a personality that is untampered with today – this roundish tone, where the front pickup is out of phase with the rear pickup. And B.B. still plays a Gibson amplifier that is long out of production. His sound comes from that combination. It's just B.B.

Key Tracks: "3 O'Clock Blues," "The Thrill Is Gone," "Sweet Little Angel"

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Related
The 100 Greatest Singers of All Time: B.B. King
The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time: B.B. King's 'Live at the Regal'

 
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