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Album Review

Give Me Strength: The '74/'75 Studio Recordings

December 10, 2013

Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs was Eric Clapton's Icarus flight. His next three albums – 461 Ocean Boulevard, There's One in Every Crowd and the live E.C. Was Here – were outpatient clinics, where he rebuilt himself and his music after...

Album Review

Old Sock

March 12, 2013

There are many Eric Claptons: firebrand electric bluesman, psychedelic jam god, avuncular song historian, easy-listening singer-songwriter. Clapton's 21st LP finds him mainly playing the latter two roles with an all-star crew. The song selection, long...

Album Review

Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs: 40th Anniversary Deluxe Edition

March 29, 2011

Recorded in six weeks in the late summer of 1970, Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs is one of rock's greatest broken promises. The original double LP was the only studio album by Eric Clapton's exceptional alliance with keyboard player Bobby Whitlock,...

Album Review

On Tour With Eric Clapton (Deluxe Edition)

August 12, 2010

Delaney and Bonnie Bramlett were a husband-and-wife team whose soul- inflected rock earned them an admirer in Eric Clapton — the guitarist even credited Delaney for giving him the confidence to sing. Cut at London's Royal Albert Hall while the Bramletts...

Album Review

Back Home

September 8, 2005

As this title to Eric Clapton's new album has it, the guitar giant has now returned back home from his recent meetings at the crossroads with Robert Johnson (Me and Mr. Johnson, Sessions for Robert J) — and the new album is a far more restrained,...

Album Review

Layla Sessions: 20th Anniversary Edition...

January 27, 2005

This review originally ran in Rolling Stone as part of a series that looked back at classic albums. By 1970, Eric Clapton had fallen desperately — and, at that point, unrequitedly — in love with the wife of his best friend, George Harrison....

Album Review

One More Car, One More Rider

October 22, 2002

The inconsistent double live album One More Car, One More Rider strives to represent the harder and softer sides of Eric Clapton. Sometimes, on warhorses such as "Hootchie Coochie Man" and "Have You Ever Loved a Woman," he transports listeners to the...

Album Review

Blues

August 19, 1999

Eric Clapton's relationship to the blues is so long-standing that it resists summary. But the release of this smartly assembled two-disc set makes it possible to say that with three purchases — Blues Breakers With Eric Clapton (1966) and From the...

Album Review

From The Cradle

February 2, 1998
Not Rated

John Mellencamp's's most trenchant work — Scarecrow, The Lonesome Jubilee, Big Daddy — is folksy and ruminative, but the cocky Hoosier made his name as a rocker. Dance Naked is his toughest rock yet: a spare, nine-song, guitar-bass-drums depth...

Album Review

24 Nights

October 31, 1991

Under normal circumstances, the release of this comprehensive live Eric Clapton album should herald a tribute to a rocker who has weathered more than twenty-five years in the trenches with a singular grace. Recorded in the cavernous Royal Albert Hall...

Album Review

Journeyman

November 30, 1989

After Crossroads, the twenty-five-year retrospective whose very title conveyed the importance of Eric Clapton's achievement, there's something disconcertingly modest about the title of his new album. A journeyman, after all, is hardly the most glamorous...

Album Review

The Complete Recordings

May 17, 2011

This remastered two-disc collection brings an unprecedented level of clarity, intimacy and immediacy to immortal Thirties blues recordings that laid a blueprint for everyone from Eric Clapton to Jack White. No new songs have emerged. But the producers'...

Album Review

Clapton

September 27, 2010

Eric Clapton basically makes two kinds of solo albums. There are his escapes from the strict letter and law of electric blues: the brisk white soul of 1970's Eric Clapton; the cruising-speed funk and reggae on 1974's 461 Ocean Boulevard; the 1992 smash...

Album Review

Traveling Wilburys Vol. 1 – Reissue

June 13, 2007

Two of the original five Wilburys have moseyed on, mortality-wise: George Harrison and Roy Orbison. But what really sounds boneyard-bound on these reissues is Jeff Lynne's production. In the late 1980s, he produced every other record on rock radio (i.e.,...

Album Review

Layla And Other Assorted Love Songs

January 27, 2005

This review originally ran in Rolling Stone as part of a series that looked back at classic albums. By 1970, Eric Clapton had fallen desperately — and, at that point, unrequitedly — in love with the wife of his best friend, George Harrison....

Album Review

Me and Mr. Johnson

March 24, 2004

Of the many reasons why middle-class white boys such as Eric Clapton and Aerosmith flocked to the music of older, impoverished black men in the 1960s and early 1970s, here is one of the best: The great bluesmen were also great pop songwriters. Robert...

Album Review

Reptile

March 5, 2001

In the mid-Sixties, worried that the Yardbirds were pandering to the burgeoning Liverpool sound, Eric Clapton bolted the band to join John Mayall's Bluesbreakers. Since then, that dichotomy has marked his career — through most of the Nineties, Clapton...

Album Review

Pilgrim

February 25, 1998

Much of Eric Clapton's haunting new album is informed by the smooth R&B textures of his 1996 collaboration with Kenneth "Babyface" Edmonds, "Change the World." Yet Pilgrim is the work of someone who has learned in the hardest way imaginable that although...

Album Review

The 30th Anniversary Concert Celebration

September 16, 1993

At Bob Dylan's anniversary celebration, held at Madison Square Garden on Oct. 16, 1992, the event transcended the man. Between the stunning range of artists who performed Dylan's songs – from Stevie Wonder to Roger McGuinn, Tracy Chapman to Eric...

Album Review

Layla Sessions: 20th Anniversary Edition...

October 4, 1990

As a near fatality of the Woodstock Generation's holy trinity — love, music and drugs — Eric Clapton was more than qualified to sing the blues by 1970. Guitar-god superstardom had left the twenty-five-year-old legend disillusioned and burnt;...

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