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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/wings-over-america-548x548-1368722983.jpg Wings Over America [Deluxe Edition]

Wings

Wings Over America [Deluxe Edition]

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5 3.5 0
26
May 28, 2013

Wings Over America was Paul McCartney’s bold arena-rock (as opposed to pop) move of the 1970s – a triple-disc live set, complete with vocal showcases for the backup guys. It was also the first time he remade Beatles oldies – “Blackbird” and “Bluebird” fit together well. There’s something daft and touching about how McCartney strives for band democracy: Whenever Denny Laine sings lead, you can almost hear the fans stampede for their bathroom weed break. Now reissued with a variety of bonus goodies, Wings Over America is a time capsule from a neglected phase of the Macca saga – an artifact for Seventies stoners who thought Wings were heavier than the Beatles.

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