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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/8159210d33d735b6f7aab5d1f6dde8838b83a475.jpg Tron: Legacy

Daft Punk

Tron: Legacy

Walt Disney
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3 0
December 7, 2010

This should have been a match made in disco heaven. Tron: Legacy is the sequel to a movie about a man trapped in a 1980s video game. Daft Punk — the vocoder-crazed, spacesuit-clad French electro duo — have always seemed like musicians trapped in a 1980s video game. Whether Daft Punk have created a worthy soundtrack is for filmgoers to decide. As for the album they've made — it's so-so mood music, full of dramatic, string-suffused sounds that are sometimes moving and sometimes just there. Daft Punk cut much of Tron: Legacy in London with a 100-piece orchestra. Far too often, the strings just hold one chord amid electronic noodling, though on "The Game Has Changed," they swell and flutter alongside acid-damaged synths and digital thuds, suggesting a particularly suspenseful Radiohead track.

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What's really missing on Tron: Legacy is groove. There are glimpses of the party-starting robots we've come to love: The sleekly digital "End of the Line" sounds like 21st-century Kraftwerk, and "Derezzed" is a pounding house track with synth squeals that recall Daft Punk's 1996 dance-floor classic "Da Funk." But that's about it as far as rhythm is concerned. Tron: Legacy is way more Hans Zimmer than Homework.

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