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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/boards-of-canada-tomorrow-s-harvest-1367258307-crop-550x552-1370291814.png Tomorrow's Harvest

Boards of Canada

Tomorrow's Harvest

Warp
Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3.5 0
June 11, 2013

Before EDM, there was IDM: so-called intelligent dance music, made by laptop auteurs who wouldn't be caught dead at an Electric Daisy Carnival, if such a thing had existed yet. A lot has changed in electronic music since those days, not that you'd know it from Boards of Canada's comeback album. The publicity-averse Scottish duo pick up more or less where they left off seven years ago, orchestrating an hourlong suite of ambient creepers, downtempo chillers and other old versions of the future. There's plenty of intellect on Tomorrow's Harvest but not nearly as much soul; like an intricate artifact found preserved in a glacier, this album is impressive to behold, but cold to the touch. 

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