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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/1b76e4d451527a2c2bf213d5e35f204bd7f9213c.jpg There Is No Enemy

Built To Spill

There Is No Enemy

Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3.5 0
September 29, 2009

Built to Spill CEO Doug Martsch is alt-rock's Thomas Pynchon, holed up in a remote studio (Boise, Idaho) and issuing immaculate artworks when he damnwell pleases. His latest is classic latter-day BTS, a crystal palace ofrefracting guitar tones and textures, walls rising majestically above hissweet, nasal mewl. What's on Martsch's mind? What you'd expect from a dudespending lots of time in his head: dreams, boredom, life's meaning or lackthereof. Those seeking the naive concision of earlier records will bedisappointed: Most songs sprawl near five minutes or longer. But theircomponents are all about simple melodic beauty, writ large — prog-rock for pop purists.

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