.
http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/af0e4200331d6df33b53470bc8046aa40b65ae13.jpg The Grand Illusion

Styx

The Grand Illusion

Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 0 0
November 3, 1977

Styx blends the progressive, keyboard-oriented intellectualism of primitive Yes with the gritty CroMagnon sense of guitar mania that used to be equated with such third-generation bands as Grand Funk and Bloodrock. Styx also possesses a strong sense of musical dramatics: on one album, the group actually equaled the foreboding drama of the Doors' "Horse Latitudes" with an ode to lava and fire entitled "Krakatoa."

 

Grand Illusion sallies forth with cuts that encompass the rage of heavy metal and the lugubrious smoothness of the "progressive" haze. The most dynamic song on the album, "Miss America," simply reeks of misogynistic misdirection. What Styx thinks is a compliance with current feminist fashion turns out to be nothing more than a spiteful acquiescence to sexual bigotry and impotence. Styx better watch out because if Bert Parks ever heard this song he'd send his legions of runners-up to stomp the group back into its Stygian depths. The rest of Grand Illusion maintains the same kind of musical imagery Styx has had all along: simple, effective noise for the teenager in search of a progressive thrill.

prev
Album Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More
    Around the Web
    Powered By ZergNet
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “You Oughta Know”

    Alanis Morissette | 1995

    This blunt, bitter breakup song -- famous for its line "Would she go down on you in a theater?" -- was long rumored to be about Alanis Morissette getting dumped by Full House actor Dave Coulier. But while she never confirmed it was about him (Coulier himself says it is, however), she insisted the song wasn't all about scorn. "By no means is this record just a sexual, angry record," she told Rolling Stone. "The song wasn't written for the sake of revenge. It was written for the sake of release. I'm actually a pretty rational, calm person."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com