.
http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/1543af9b9b58be7e28155aa15eaf87c3278fc55f.jpg The Best Of Love

Love

The Best Of Love

Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 4 0
March 25, 2003

Some of the best-known bands in Los Angeles in the Sixties became brand names for a particular style of rock: jangling folk rock for the Byrds, portentous doom rock for the Doors. Love not only bridged the gap between those two groups, they also tried to summon up every color of psychedelia. The range of their sound meant that they never really progressed past cult-band status, but Love were a cult worth joining and still sound fresh and inventive today. Lead singer Arthur Lee, a black man from Memphis, led this interracial band into uncharted waters, singing about orange skies and snot caked on his pants. This generous twenty-two-track compilation ranges from hard-rock freakouts ("Seven and Seven Is") to wistful pop ("She Comes in Colors") to trippy mariachi ("Maybe the People Would Be the Times, or Between Clark and Hilldale"). It also includes the grooviest up-tempo version of "Hey Joe" you'll ever hear.

prev
Album Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More
    Around the Web
    Powered By ZergNet
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “You Oughta Know”

    Alanis Morissette | 1995

    This blunt, bitter breakup song -- famous for its line "Would she go down on you in a theater?" -- was long rumored to be about Alanis Morissette getting dumped by Full House actor Dave Coulier. But while she never confirmed it was about him (Coulier himself says it is, however), she insisted the song wasn't all about scorn. "By no means is this record just a sexual, angry record," she told Rolling Stone. "The song wasn't written for the sake of revenge. It was written for the sake of release. I'm actually a pretty rational, calm person."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com