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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/1543af9b9b58be7e28155aa15eaf87c3278fc55f.jpg The Best Of Love

Love

The Best Of Love

Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 4 0
March 25, 2003

Some of the best-known bands in Los Angeles in the Sixties became brand names for a particular style of rock: jangling folk rock for the Byrds, portentous doom rock for the Doors. Love not only bridged the gap between those two groups, they also tried to summon up every color of psychedelia. The range of their sound meant that they never really progressed past cult-band status, but Love were a cult worth joining and still sound fresh and inventive today. Lead singer Arthur Lee, a black man from Memphis, led this interracial band into uncharted waters, singing about orange skies and snot caked on his pants. This generous twenty-two-track compilation ranges from hard-rock freakouts ("Seven and Seven Is") to wistful pop ("She Comes in Colors") to trippy mariachi ("Maybe the People Would Be the Times, or Between Clark and Hilldale"). It also includes the grooviest up-tempo version of "Hey Joe" you'll ever hear.

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