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http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/3d037483a2a7f8ecc2cb51104f8a280ba7213f83.jpg Stiff Upper Lip

AC/DC

Stiff Upper Lip

Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3 0
March 30, 2000

A ballad-laden song cycle of delicate political tone poems — just checking to see if you were paying attention. Stiff Upper Lip — an album that comes twenty years after AC/DC were written off following the death of frontman Bon Scott — is everything we've come to expect from the band and absolutely nothing more. A wonderfully juvenile set of leering rawk, Lip is the first new album in five years from these middle-aged purists. The album has two factors in its favor: It's even louder than normal, and it was produced by George Young (the older brother of guitarists Angus and Malcolm Young), which means Lip is old-school all the way; this is the classic Back in Black lineup bashing out minimalist arena rock. Inspirational (if currently questionable) song title: "Can't Stop Rock 'n' Roll." Let it be said: These guys still know how to crank it to eleven.

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