.
http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/4c1e381d6ae6359e4d9954d2ab9583d010b0b8b0.jpg Spice

Spice Girls

Spice

Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 1.5 0
March 20, 1997

Following in the footsteps of Take That and New Kids on the Block — two other bubblegum-pop groups that were also huge in England — Spice Girls offer a watered-down mix of hip-hop and cheesy pop balladry. And like New Kids on the Block, Spice Girls are five attractive young things, each with a distinct personality, a la the Village People, brought together by a manager with a marketing concept.

One part of that concept has the Girls preaching, "Girl power!" — a co-optation more heinous than any riot grrrl's worst nightmare. Spice Girls' idea of power seems to be flaunting that they are all that, but the lyrics make Alanis Morissette's sound like Patti Smith's. A few nuggets: "If you want to get with me, better make it fast" ("Wannabe"); "I know you want to get with me" ("Last Time Lover"); "Show me how good you are" (Who Do You Think Your Are?). Despite their pro-woman posing, the Girls don't get bogged down by anything deeper than mugging for promo shots and giving out tips on getting boys in bed.

Wild Orchid are three hot-looking women — one of whom closely resembles Wendy Wilson of Wilson Phillips — singing melodramatic songs with flat melodies about their dysfunctional relationships. They're like the friends whom you want to slap upside the head while forcing them to read Women Who Love Too Much. They do have much better voices than Spice Girls, but at least the members of Spice Girls project lots of false confidence. I'll take cocky over whiny any day.

prev
Album Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More
    Around the Web
    Powered By ZergNet
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “Bird on a Wire”

    Leonard Cohen | 1969

    While living on the Greek island of Hydra, Cohen was battling a lingering depression when his girlfriend handed him a guitar and suggested he play something. After spotting a bird on a telephone wire, Cohen wrote this prayer-like song of guilt. First recorded by Judy Collins, it would be performed numerous times by artists incuding Johnny Cash, Joe Cocker and Rita Coolidge. "I'm always knocked out when I hear my songs covered or used in some situation," Cohen told Rolling Stone. "I've never gotten over the fact that people out there like my music."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com