.
http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/4b296b948ed4753211f28efba496d4bbabd576b2.jpg Slang

Def Leppard

Slang

Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 0 0
February 2, 1998

In the '80s, Def Leppard's extravagant productions and power-rock anthems prompted a generation to empty its pockets and unzip its pants in pursuit of pop nirvana. But today's listeners want more than cheap thrills and stomping sing-alongs. To comply, the band has stripped down its booming sound and expanded its musical vocabulary.

Sometimes it works, as on "Truth?," an aggressive track with industrial overtones, and "Turn to Dust," which blends cheeseball hooks with Middle Eastern melodies. But the dance beats and funk rhythms on the title track and "Breathe a Sigh" are strangely reminiscent of Prince and TLC, and with helium vocals and a few more synths, "Work It Out" might sound like Rush. Slang rarely rocks; Def Leppard seem too consumed with sounding hip to let loose any real dynamic guitar squalor. The band has lost its drive and focus, which may prompt some fans to ask, "Oh, I just gotta know if you're really there and you really care."

prev
Album Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More
    Around the Web
    Powered By ZergNet
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “American Girl”

    Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers | 1976

    It turns out that a single with "American" in its title--recorded on the Fourth of July during the nation's Bicentennial, no less--can actually sell better in Britain. Coupled with the Heartbreakers' flair for Byrds jangle and Animals hooks, though, is Tom Petty's native-Florida drawl that keeps this classic grounded at home. Petty dispelled rumors that the song was about a suicidal student, explaining that the inspiration came from when he was 25 and used to salute the highway traffic outside his apartment window. "It sounded like the ocean to me," he recalled. "That was my ocean. My Malibu. Where I heard the waves crash, but it was just the cars going by."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com