.
http://assets-s3.rollingstone.com/assets/images/album_review/300492fc154043f63586b3bde562fc6be7a8b2a7.jpg Skeletons from the Closet: The Best of Grateful Dead

The Grateful Dead

Skeletons from the Closet: The Best of Grateful Dead

Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 0 0
April 25, 1974

The Dead pretend they're a singles band in this collection of their best-known shorter tracks. The cumulative results are distinguished, not by profundity or virtuosity, but by a characteristic pleasantness. The album boasts attractive melodies and supple rhythmic patterns. But the anthology also exposes some ongoing weaknesses: dull recorded sound, thin instrumental arrangements, frail vocals (except for Bob Weir's occasional leads) and, more generally, music consistently without sufficient emotional depth or narrative strength. The three Weir tracks are by far the most spirited of the 11 on the album, and "Uncle John's Band" has the cheerful spontaneity of a street-corner chorale. The selections are well chosen and the album's 45 minutes are generous by current single-LP standards. But in isolating their persistent flaws as well as occasional successes, Skeletons from the Closet suggests that the Grateful Dead may never have been an exceptional recording group.

prev
Album Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “Promiscuous”

    Nelly Furtado with Timbaland | 2006

    This club-oriented single featuring Timbaland, who produced Nelly Furtado's third album, Loose, was Furtado’s sexy return after the Canadian singer's exploration of her Portuguese heritage on Folklore. "In the studio, initially I didn’t know if I could do it, 'cause Timbaland wrote that chorus," Furtado said. "I'm like, 'That's cool, but I don't know if I'm ready to do full-out club.'" The flirty lyrics are a dance between a guy and girl, each knowing they will end up in bed together but still playing the game. "Tim and I called it 'The BlackBerry Song,' she said, "because everything we say in the song you could text-message to somebody."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com